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 Art of Orovitz

     Anamorphic art involves distorting an image on a flat plane so that its reflection on a curved surface (many different types of curved surfaces have been used) reveals the undistorted image. Anamorphic images do not necessarily have to be revealed on mirrors as in the example below. The distorted image is usually hard to discern.

      Anamorphic art has been around since the time of Leonardo Da Vinci and was quite popular during the 17th and 18th centuries. It has been traditionally used to hide secret images or political messages in artistic works.

     Hungarian artist Istvan Orovitz is a master at creating a new form of anamorphic art, which utilizes ambiguous images. In other words, he is using one illusion to create another illusion, which produces a rather spectacular result.

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     Here, Orovitz used a real three-dimensional set of stairs, which can be seen from three separate angles. The first two angles reveal a figure walking up the stairs that is quite distorted. Only in the final frame can does the anamorphic image resolve itself.

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     In these two examples, Orovitz uses ambiguous imagery to create a new portrait in the reflected surface. The left example contains a scene from Jules Verne's Mysterious Island, which Orovitz created in the 19th century line illustration style. When the mirror is placed correctly on the image a portrait of Jules Verne is revealed!

    In the right example, a Greek amphitheater reveals a minotaur in the mirror.

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